Tuesday Treats: One Aurifil size does NOT have to fit all (part 2)

Back in April I started a series about the different Cotton Mako’ thread weights to explain the place each thread weight can have in our textile tool kit.

The thread I wrote about then was Cotton Mako’ 40 , so this time I want to highlight what can be achieved with Cotton Mako’ 28.

Beautiful hand quilting by Judy Leckie

Beautiful hand quilting by Judy Leckie

Cotton Mako’ 28 is on the thicker side of the Cotton Mako’ range, making it perfect for traditional hand quilting.

I’ve always found that the threads, in other brands, that are especially treated for “hand” quilting  are stiff and springy and seem to have a mind of their own that doesn’t necessarily match with how I want the stitches to form.

So I love the way Cotton Mako’ 28 sits in the needle neatly, and the stitches form without any twisting or tangling.

More of Judy Leckie's beautiful hand quilting

More of Judy Leckie’s beautiful hand quilting

Like all the Mako’ range the 28 weight thread is mercerised, but does not have any of the waxing or glazing that can make those other threads so difficult to handle when hand quilting.

Cotton Mako' 28 is identified by the grey spool base.

Cotton Mako’ 28 is identified by the grey spool base.

Because the thread has not been waxed or glazed, Cotton Mako’ 28 is also suitable for use as a machine quilting thread.

In fact, it’s slightly thicker nature means that motifs and feature designs show up very nicely on the quilt top.

Machine Quilting motifs are clearly defined when stitched with Cotton Mako' 28

Machine Quilting motifs are clearly defined when stitched with Cotton Mako’ 28

However, I always think of Cotton Mako’ 28 as more than a quilting thread.

Try using it for hand & machine blanket stitch applique.

Hand blanket stitch with a single strand of cotton Mako' 28

Hand blanket stitch with a single strand of cotton Mako’ 28

or machine embroidery

Machine embroidery using Cotton Mako' 28

Machine embroidery using Cotton Mako’ 28

or hand embroidery.

My cross stitch has been stitched with a single strand of Cotton Mako’ 28 on size 14 Aida cloth.

Cross Stitch and hand embroidery using Cotton Mako' 28

Cross Stitch and hand embroidery using Cotton Mako’ 28

And the most surprising use of all, given the slightly thicker nature of the thread.

Some people choose it as their preferred hand piecing thread, especially if they use a small running stitch.

You can load the needle with many stitches when hand piecing with Cotton Mako' 28

You can load the needle with many stitches when hand piecing with Cotton Mako’ 28

So, like all the threads in the Cotton Mako’ range, the Mako’ 28 is very versatile.

Once you have some in your thread stash you will keep finding more and more reasons to use this great thread.

The Simply colour thread Collection by Vanessa Christenson of "V & Co"

The Simply Colour thread Collection by Vanessa Christenson of “V & Co”

Read more about Cotton Mako’ 28:

 A review of the Aurifil range by Alyssa

Using Cotton Mako’ 28 for Cross Stitch

A vote for hand stitching

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6 Responses

  1. […] already written about Cotton Mako’ 40 & Cotton Mako 28 so now it is time to feature Cotton Mako’ […]

  2. […] You can see more of Judy’s award winning work here. […]

  3. Thank you for sharing all those examples, I’m in love with 50 weight for machine piecing & quilting but I’d love to try some of the 28 weight for some hand/machine quilting to.

    • Hi Jessica, I think having 4 different thread weights of Cotton Mako’ in such high quality cotton is what makes Aurifil so special.

      It allows you to choose different thread weights to create a particular effect, and you can even choose them in the one colour to create texture on a project. You can have so much fun.

      You will enjoy playing with the 28 weight.
      Jenny

  4. Hi Marie, I think that you will enjoy playing with Cotton Mako’ 28. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

  5. Thanks for your post on the use of the Cotton Mako 28. Looks like I will be adding this to my stash. Thanks for sharing. Marie

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