Tuesday Treats: Quilts appear in surprising places

I promised to write more about our outback holiday and thought that you would enjoy seeing a little about the textile treasures I saw at old Andado.

Old Andado homestead has been left furnished as a reminder of how isolated life once was in outback Australia

One of the people we met while driving across the Simpson Desert said, that as we were this close (200 km) to old Andado homestead we really should continue on to visit the house.

The original house was built in 1910, with additions being made over the years until a new homestead was built 18 kilometres away.

Several generations of communications can be seen here on the desk

Molly’s life at old Andado, 350 km south east of Alice Springs, was typical of the lives of many of the women who lived in isolation in the outback in the 20th Century.

In the 1970s the owners of Andado Station, Molly & Mac Clarke had restored the old original homestead and turned it into tourist accommodation.

A close up view of the broderie perse cushion on the office chair

Molly eventually moved back to live at Old Andado in the late 1980’s, after the death of her husband and son and, in 1993,  “Old Andado” was listed in the Heritage Register.

In 1995, Molly received a Brolga Award for her achievements for tourism in the Northern Territory.

Everywhere I looked I found embroidery

In 2006, when declining health meant that she could no longer live there by herself, Molly moved to Alice Springs but the house is still open to travellers to visit.

A close up view of the cushions

It was quite eerie to walk through the house, finding it left as if the owner had just stepped out for half an hour.

Molly’s bedroom with a lovely log cabin quilt on the bed.

Where ever you looked in the house, there were decorative touches showing that the house had been a home.

Beaten out Kerosene tins were a traditional form of decoration in the past

Some of the furnishings at the house were a reminder of just how easy our modern lives have become.

The paper lace mantel decoration was cut out of an old newslpaper

All the family meals would have been prepared on a wood stove.

A laundry mangle was once a modern invention

Washing would have been done by hand after boiling in a copper.

Butter didn’t always come in a tub from the supermarket.

And you couldn’t just dash down to the local store for basic daily foods.

Molly felt strongly about the need to recognise the contribution of pioneering women in all fields of endeavour.

In the 1980’s Molly was disappointed with the way women were represented in the “Stockmen’s Hall of Fame” in Longreach, so she worked to establish a National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame.

It had a temporary home at the old court house in Alice Springs until a permanent facility was found in the town’s old jailhouse.

The National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame was officially re-opened in Alice Springs on 8th March 2007.

The first view of Old Andado as you drive into the homestead from the south.

Molly’s life at old Andado, 350 km south east of Alice Springs, was typical of the lives of many of the women who lived in isolation in the outback in the 20th Century.

Old Andado is open to the public in that typical way you find in the outback:

Visitors are welcome
Please respect our property and
leave things the way you found them

Public roads cross station fence lines in the outback so always leave things the way you find them

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