How to Fold Quilts (Crease Free) when Moving Across Town, the Country or the World

I have moved cites, countries and continents. Most recently, I moved from the east coast of Australia to the west coast of Australia…and back again. Some of the first items I planned to take with me were a selection of my quilts.

Taking your quilts with you to a new community not only gives you and your family something familiar and comforting in your new surroundings, it also provides a common talking point when you visit or start a new quilting group in your new location.

The baggage allowance for my flight was dedicated to clothes, so I decided to pack a suitcase with a selection of quilts that would be transported in our shipping container. The amount of time these quilts would be in transit was only an estimate and I wanted my quilts to arrive without creases or wrinkles.

Avoid folding your quilts into rectangles or squares as this can create a permanent fold mark into the grain line of your piece. If you have ever ‘finger pressed’ a piece of patchwork you know how the fabric can ‘hold’ a crease.
Good results are achieved by folding your quilts on the bias.

Follow these steps for best results:

1st Fold diagonally

1st Fold diagonally

Fold Diagonally again

Fold Diagonally again

Third Fold

Third Fold

Fourth and final fold

Fourth and final fold

Stack of Folded quilts

Stack of Folded quilts

Suitcase of quilts

Suitcase of quilts

Smooth, Crease-free quilt after 2 weeks in a suitcase

Smooth, Crease-free quilt after 2 weeks in a suitcase

There are several ways to keep quilts at their best when in transit. We would enjoy hearing about your methods and experiences transporting your quilts around the corner or around the world.

Pinwheel Passion

At the beginning of this year, I celebrated the birth of my first grandchild, and like quilting grannies through the generations, wished to mark the occasion with the creation of a quilt.

I decided to ignore all the beautiful baby quilt patterns available commercially and design my own quilt using the pinwheel block with three narrow borders, using bright fabrics on a white background.

Camera file jan2015 075To make the pinwheel block I used a technique  where you start with squares.

You take 2 squares of contrasting fabric and sew them right sides together, with a 1/4 inch seam all the way around the edge.

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Pinwheel squares sewn with 1/4 inch seams around the perimeter.

Then you cut the joined squares on each diagonal, being careful not to move the squares out of alignment as you rotate. (Tip: move your cutting mat around, not the squares, or better still, invest in a rotating mat!)

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Cut the sewn squares diagonally.

Press the seams on your triangles, firstly as closed seams, then open them out and press with the seam in the direction of the darker fabric.

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Pressing seams closed first.

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Now press seams open and towards the darker fabric.

At this point you will have four matching squares which you arrange to form the pinwheel design and then sew  together.  TQH 001

Sorry, I forgot to take a photo of this when I was making my quilt so the sample looks a little different.

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Joining the pinwheel block.

If you wish to see a video of this technique and find out how large to cut your squares to reach the desired block size go to http://blog.missouriquiltco.com/update-on-the-easy-pinwheels/  You may notice that there is a great deal of confusion about the cutting size required to obtain the pinwheel square you require. The following method is accurate:

Take the finished size you wish your block to be (i.e. without any seam allowance)

Multiply by 1.41

Divide by 2

Add 1.25

Round up/down to the nearest eighth of an inch.

This will make a block which includes seam allowance so that when you have joined it to its neighbouring blocks it will be the accurate size.

I needed to make 50 pinwheel blocks and cut 49 intervening plain white ones.

Having done that, I then arranged them in a pleasing layout. In the photo below I have mine pinned to an old sheet. Theoretically no two blocks were supposed to be the same, but there are two that are!!

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Arranging the layout of the blocks.

I then added the borders:a narrow plain white border, a pieced border using strips of all the fabrics used in the quilt, and finally another narrow white border. I also used white fabric to bind the quilt. This gave the effect of the pinwheels and border “floating” on the white background.

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White borders and binding.

To quilt the quilt I used a design called Curlz by Patricia Ritter. Throughout the quilt, for piecing and quilting, I used Aurifil Cotton Mako 40.

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Quilting my quilt on my long-arm machine.

Ta Da!! My completed quilt.

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My completed pinwheel quilt.

No cooking, just stitching.

For the last ten years, I have been going away for the Mother’s Day weekend to Phillip Island, a small island near Melbourne.  The  local “Patches”  group there organise a fabulous retreat from Friday to Sunday with various tutors in attendance.  The accommodation is ‘school camp’ but you put up with that as the time you have is so much fun – and you can get all your meals cooked for you (a big plus in my book!).

Some attendees  ‘socialise’ which means, doing more chatting and walking and shopping than the others who are in classes.  I don’t mention ‘stitching’ in that sentence, as having been a ‘social’ attendee in the past, I must admit I did not do as much stitching as planned.

This year I had the privilege to attend a workshop with Sydneysider, Wendy Williams who  showed us how to make her beautiful quilt “Birdsville” in  wool felt.   It was a relaxing, and (at times for me learning new embroidery stitches) a challenging time.

WW Birdsville

We learnt how to make the beautiful flowers, birds and leaves on the quilt as well as how to add pieced blocks and quilt it.

My first flowers – little steps

WW flower 2WW Flower 3

and a lonely leaf – with needle still inserted so I can remember how to do it!

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I managed my layout – though this has changed a little since I took this photo.  I chose a soft grey Japanese linen look to work on, with a deeper grey wool felt.

WWilliams layout HM

Wendy uses perle cottons for her embroidery, but I have a selection of gorgeous Ne 12 AURFIL of course, so I used those.  They work  so well and so easily being on a spool and with all the colours to choose from, my biggest problem is which one to use!  I could use them straight from the spool or double the thread up to make a slightly heavier look to my flowers and birds.

At the end of the workshop, everyone put their work down on a ‘tree’ and we saw how colourful it looked.

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I hope I can get the quilt completed sooner than later – always the aim when you come back inspired from a great workshop.  If only I could have a whole week or more just to stitch  – like on retreat!  Thanks Wendy for such a relaxing and enjoyable workshop.  Thanks too Phillip Island Patches Committee for all your hard work to make these retreats such a delight – and I am already looking forward to next year.  Maybe, I can have my “Birdsville” finished for the Show and Tell.

The seasons they are a changing ….

It is not officially winter but it certainly feels that way.

autumnI spent much of my life living in places where there wasn’t a visible change from summer to winter, so I really enjoy the autumn colours.

I am not so fond of the drop in temperature, and the rain, but if it means that I get to change my shoes from sandals to boots it can’t be that bad.

shoesBut best of all I get to start a new winter stitching project!

In the past I’ve worked on a variety of projects using Aurifil Lana wool thread for my winter project.

A traditional embroidery stitche dwith aurifil Lana

A traditional embroidery stitched with Aurifil Lana

Machine embroidery blocks for my Wagga.

This Lana embroidery has been going for sometime but it is also close to being finished.

This Lana embroidery has been going for sometime but it is also close to being finished.

Hand embroidery

Wool applique can be fun, especially if you use Aurifil Lana for the stitching

Wool applique can be fun, especially if you use Aurifil Lana for the stitching

Applique

Miniature "Granny Squares" crocheted with Lana wool blend thread.

Miniature “Granny Squares” crocheted with Lana wool blend thread.

And I am not the only one playing with Lana in winter, judysew4th had a great time crocheting miniature granny squares for a scarf one year.

lana-project-2015I found a pattern for this sweet little woolen envelop for carrying my sewing essentials, so I think that I have found my project for this winter. I’ve hunted out some fabric and a selection of Lana wool threads for the embroidery so I am all set up.

If you want to try your hand at a project using the Aurifil Lana thread checkout the full colour range on the website.

While you are browsing have a look at the patterns as well to see if there is something to tempt you to start a new project.

The Poppy

I began sewing my poppy in 2007 after visiting a Quilters Unlimited show in Herndon, Virginia, USA. I purchased the Carol Morrissey pattern at their merchant’s mall and then spent several years deciding on which fabric to use.
The years sped by and the applique took place a petal at a time with other projects started and finished as the poppy was pushed to the bottom of the ‘to do’ pile.
The poppy has special significance as a flower of remembrance world wide. After the first World War the following resolution was passed:
“The Returned Sailors and Soldiers Imperial League of Australia and other Returned Soldiers Organisations throughout the British Empire and Allied Countries have passed resolutions at their international conventions to recognise the Poppy of Flanders’ Fields as the international memorial flower to be worn on the anniversary of Armistice Day.”

” Centenary of Gallipoli ” Poppy

The Centenary of The First World War; 1914-1918, is being commemorated with poppies in many ways around the world.
The 5000 Poppies tribute calling for knitted poppies is now pushing 130,000 poppies as of late February this year.
• The quilt historian, Barbara Brackman, has featured a World War 1 Remembrance quilt on her blog; Material Culture during 2014. Where Poppies Grow-Remembering Almo was designed and made by Denniel O’Kell Bohannon and Janice Britz. My friend at Colvin Kiwi Quilts has made her version of Where Poppies Grow to commemorate her Great Grandfather’s involvement in WWI.
The Tower of London marked the centenary with poppies as well. Artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper created 888,246 ceramic poppies that progressively filled the Tower’s famous moat between 17 July and 11 November 2014.
As 2015 approached, in Australia and New Zealand, the ‘Centenary of the Gallipoli Landings’ significance was spoken about more and more, I felt my poppy needed to be finished for ANZAC Day, April 25, 2015.
With the hand applique finished, I decided to machine quilt the whole flower to the yellow background with Aurifil 40 wt and Aurifil 50wt thread.

Poppy pin basted and ready to FMQ

Poppy pin basted and ready to FMQ

With all the beautiful threads to choose from, it is hard to decide!

With all the beautiful threads to choose from, it is hard to decide!

The petals were made using hand dyed fabrics and many Aurifil threads were auditioned to either match the colours or complement the pieces as I quilted the petal’s texture.

Thread for a perfect petal

Thread for a perfect petal

The stamens were quilted with a patterned stitch that came with my sewing machine. A zigzag or blanket stitch would have worked as well.

The Poppy Stamen and Petals

The Poppy Stamen and Petals

The label includes the poem In Flanders Field written by a Canadian Medical Corps doctor, Major John McCrae, who was serving with a Field Artillery Brigade in Ypres.

In Flanders fields

In Flanders fields

The Poppy Label

The Poppy Label

If you have created a textile piece to commemorate an anniversary from your history, please share with us so we can all remember.

I said I wouldn’t do it

Oh yes, I went here on Thursday ( to AQC at the Royal Exhibition Building Melbourne)

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I said I would only go and look at the quilts and challenges and see what new shops there were.

I was only going to buy what was on the list (3 items) – quilting gloves (mine have ‘worn out) , some wool felt, and a book for a birthday present.

How come I came home with a bit more??

I was only going to buy one or two more pieces of wool felt to add to my stash.

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I am doing a workshop in a couple of weeks so I could justify that.  But when I saw the colours available, and more than one shop had wool felt.  I just weakened a tad.  These bits can go with my others:

Gelati colours I think.

And I can use my Ne 12 threads to embellish them.

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I may be ‘forced’ to look for another spool of Ne 12 – how unfortunate I work in a thread shop!
Oh – and the other purchases (but not the book, as my friend may read this blog)
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And I should also confess, I bought a new sewing machine – great excitement – an early birthday present for me.

Aurifil @AQC

The Australasian Quilters’ Convention is just around the corner (16-19th April) held at Melbourne’s Royal Exhibition Building.

Melbourne_exhibition_building

This is always an exciting event for quilters: an opportunity to see the latest in quilting trends, be inspired by the work of others, and shop for all things quilty.

Even the venue itself is full of inspiration!

Melbourne Exhibition centre, Calton Gardens

Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Carlton Gardens

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Stencil detail from Royal Exhibition Building….would look good as an applique border!

Here at Aurifil we have been very busy packing up stock for the Aurifil retailers to display on their stalls.

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Packing thread for one of our retailers.

Some of the retailers are taking a range of individual spools in various thread weights, while others are running special projects (such as block of the month) and we have been making up small packs of specially selected threads for these.

 

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We have also put together some new four packs, including 3 new reproduction basic collections, just perfect to give you a range of “go to” reproduction-coloured threads.

 

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One of three new “Reproduction Basics” collections.

These little four-packs also make great gifts (for yourself too!)

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New Four Pack: “Purple Passion”

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New four Pack: “Bubbles”.

The retailers who we know will have Aurifil for sale on their stands are:

Other Aurifil retailers present at AQC are:

In addition, some of the talented 2015 AQC tutors including Deidre Bond-Abel, Kathy Doughty, Karen Styles and Lisa Walton use Aurifil thread.

Look out for Aurifil at AQC and be sure to make certain that you have all the Aurifil supplies you need to successfully complete your current and future projects!

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