Another beautiful quilt embroidered with Aurifil threads

Wow! I’ve received a set of photos, and a story about a first quilt, from another one of our customers.

Remember earlier in the month when I wrote about Juliet’s quilt, I asked for more feedback about the quilts that you have made with Aurifil threads.

Well, Strella responded with this great story, and set of photos.

The centre of Strella’s embroidered quilt

Strella is a dedicate machine embroiderer but this is the first time that she has used embroidered blocks to make a quilt.

She said that the inspiration to start came from the Royal Reflections designs by Lyn Kenny.

The quilt was quite sometime in the making as Strella says:

I was intending to embroider some blocks for a quilt on my Pfaff 2140, in its big Grand Hoop but then I got a Pfaff Creative Vision in January 2008 and an even bigger Grand Dream Hoop. Wow, I won’t need so many blocks if they are bigger!

Strella found that she couldn’t resist playing with the embroidery designs. She wrote:

I created some blocks in Embird software for my GDH and sewed them out. However, each time I test sewed a block I decided I wanted to change something about it. May be it was to have the quilt line as a triple stitch instead of single running stitch, or change the colour combination. I could not decide on the colours for ages. Then I wanted a colour change within the circles. Where would my final decisions end?

Sounds familiar doesn’t it, when can a patchwork quilt maker ever resist modify and tweaking the design?

The bottom corner of Marlene’s quilt

Strella’s colour inspiration came from a fat quarter of a Jinny Beyer border fabric that she had purchased at a Quilt show in Melbourne the year before. As always happens, when you decide that you have found the perfect fabric in your stash you never have enough meterage for the job, but a very good friend helped her track down more on the internet.

So that was colour scheme sorted, especially as she had some satin-backed shantung in a light coffee to use as the background for the embroidery.

Strella said:

I had put the central blocks together and decided then to do the borders down each side to make it wider. I discarded the first border attempt after getting the hang of long lengths of stabilizer and basting in the hoop first.

The beautiful border designs

As often happens, what had started out to be a pair of single quilts ended up being a beautiful queen size quilt, as the embroidery & patchwork layout developed over time.

And of course the finishing touch to every quilt is the label.

An embroidered label, the perfect finish to a beautiful quilt

I have been lucky enough to watch the progress of this quilt over the years. Strella has been a regular visitor in the store to purchase Aurifil thread for the embroidery and piecing, and recently to even purchase the backing fabric.  So although I know very little about the machine embroidery techniques used, I can appreciate the beauty of this quilt when seen in real life.

Don’t forget that we love seeing work that you have completed with Aurifil threads.

So please send us good quality photos, and a brief story, so that we can share your project here with readers of our blog.

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3 Responses

  1. [...] Ladybirdee used Lana for a lot of her stitching projects this year, [...]

  2. [...] Another beautiful quilt embroidered with Aurifil threads (alwaysquilting.wordpress.com) [...]

  3. [...] Another beautiful quilt embroidered with Aurifil threads (alwaysquilting.wordpress.com) [...]

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